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New York City’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) plans to rid its transportation fleet of the harmful coronavirus through beams of ultraviolet light, officials say.

The MTA announced a pilot program with Puro Lighting, a company specializing in UV disinfection lighting devices. The $1 million investment will result in 230 far ultraviolet-C (far-UVC) lamps rolled out on trains, buses and in agency facilities next week, according to MTA Chairman Pat Foye.

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The lamps will be used during overnight closures. Since May 6, the MTA has implemented overnight subway closures from 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. to sanitize. The method is not safe for human exposure, explained Dr. David Brenner, who is spearheading the effort.

The use of UV light to kill bacteria and viruses has been around for more than 100 years, he said on a recent segment of “The Ingraham Angle.”

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Brenner, a radiation biophysics professor at Columbia University, said UV light has been used to decontaminate “surgical operating theaters,” leaving behind a “nice, clean environment” the following morning. He said the method is “very effective at killing microbes.”